Web literacy is taking digital literacy further. I do not think it differs. It just is a higher level of skill to the multifaceted definitions of "digital literacy". If I were to bring the specific idea of web literacy to students, it'd be through connecting recent world events in a multimedia form, such as this video I made:

Fact Checking: Donating Online in Emergency Disasters

Coalfields e-book shed so much light on the importance of fact-checking. As Caulfield stated “real problems students confront daily is evaluating the information that reaches them through their social media streams.”
“Our normal inclination is to ignore verification needs when we react strongly to content, and researchers have found that content that causes strong emotions (both positive and negative) spreads the fastest through our social networks.”
Due to recent world and personal events, I thought his book should be updated to include how to fact check GoFundMe charities, viral videos and what I will cover in this video, fact checking non profits in emergency disasters.
What happens when a disaster occurs? From a police shooting unarmed individual to catastrophic environmental disasters. Many people turn to the Internet for support, from sharing to donating.

Similar to Caulfield’s fact checking approaches, find out if possible who founded the organization. How long has it been operating? If it’s older, find out about the CEO and how much their salary is. What is their mission? Do they have proof of their missions? Have they had accountability issues in the past?

As Caulfield states “do not look at what the organization says about itself, look at what the Web tells you about the organization.”
I will talk about a disaster that affected my family and I personally…Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico.
After the hurricane occurred, the governor of PR wife Beatriz Rosello quickly made a nonprofit, which celebrities were so quick to advertise and donate to. “Unidos por Puerto Rico”. While I made a personal decision not to donate the funds I raised locally to this organization, I stayed on top of the news to see what they would do with the money. They raised nearly 40 million dollars. The problem? The governors wife decided where the money would go to and what did she choose? To restore the public parks in all municipalities.
El Vocero, a local newspaper, reported how citizens and representatives QUICKLY turned to protests. People had no food, electricity, ceilings, schools were shut down (and still are). How could all the money go to restoring parks?
But it wasn’t the citizens that had a voice in the public, including English media, about the matter. It was the celebrities, the same ones who donated who made the headlines. Lin Manuel Miranda, creator of Hamilton and PuertoRican supermodel Joan Smalls called Beatriz Rosello out like it is.
Unidos por Puerto Rico had to change how they would manage the money and ended up dispursing it to OTHER non profits. While I can keep fact checking on the individual non profits, I will stop there just to prove the importance of researching and accountability of these organizations in moments of stress and unrest. The digital world is allowing for these organizations to be held more accountable and its up to us to research before we donate

The following websites you can check out validity and information about charities:

Give.org
Charitynavigator.org
Charitywatch.org
Guidestar.org

Think before you give. Thank you.

(Background music: "Wayfinding" from Moana Deluxe Soundtrack)

Mike Caulfield. Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers.
"Real problems students confront daily: evaluating the information that   reaches them through their social media streams."
"Our normal inclination is to ignore verification needs when we react strongly to content, and researchers have found that content that causes strong emotions (both positive and negative) spreads the fastest through  our social networks."
Mike Caulfield. Civix Media Literacy Videos.
"Do not look at what the organization says about itself, look at what the Web tells you about the organization."
Digital Polarization Initiative.
"We have a no-jerks rule. When editing work of others, don't be a jerk. When writing something up, don't sound like a jerk...don't choose a jerky username."

One thought on “Readings 3”

  1. Some of the problem with defining these things is figuring out when “more” becomes “different.” For example, let’s use something you did recently: Twitter polling. One might see using Twitter as representing all kinds of skills at different levels: simple posting, posting effectively, using the medium (hashtags and language), asking questions, etc. Is all of this literacy or is some of it citizenship?

    In other words, knowing how to post any question to Twitter is a skill, and knowing how to EFFECTIVELY ask a question is a part of literacy, is creating a poll still part of literacy, just something more, or is it “more enough” to be different?

    For this reason, too, you will see (and I do this sometimes) an idea of “digital fluency” as a recognition of these higher level activities that are high enough to feel different…or perhaps just be categorized as such so that literacy doesn’t become an impossible monster to teach/support 🙂

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